Lady Parts (a hidden history)

Part of the inspiration for Renegade was the desire to hear and share something new. And sometimes, when you want something, you gotta make it yourself...and I wanted to hear new stories. While it would be nice if my talents lay in sewing beautiful clothing and cobbling shoes, my superpower is talking animatedly about things I love. And I love St. Louis. So there.  Renegade.  

So, today, let's give Lewis and Clark, Henry Shaw, Auguste Chouteau, and good ol' Laclede a rest...and dig around for some kick-ass ladies in STL's history.  You in?  Good...first up...this lady:

Photo from Notable Women of St. Louis, 1914, credited to Gerhard Sisters...whom I totally plan to learn about.

Photo from Notable Women of St. Louis, 1914, credited to Gerhard Sisters...whom I totally plan to learn about.

Name:  Caroline Risque (later her last name was Janis...but Risque is so amazing, we're gonna ignore that part)

Lived:  1883 - 1952

Did:  She basically did all the things all women wish they did: Spending her early 20s in Paris, studying art, eventually becoming an accomplished sculptor and painter, and in St. Louis, hung out with smart ladies like Sara Teasdale.  She attended Washington University School of Art, and was later Head of the Art Dept. at Burroughs School. Which, if you don't know, is fancier than the school you went to, I promise.  

I like her as an example of early 20th century woman...if she was alive today, you know you'd wanna be her friend, but she'd probably be too cool.  She's buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery, in an unmarked grave next to other family members.  I found her in an amazing (in a super nerd way) book, Notable Women of St. Louis, written in 1914 about , um, notable women in STL at that time. It's not a history book...it's basically a Who's Who of Lady Awesomeness for 1914.  

My favorite quote from her:

To have the tenacity of purpose and the love of the work so one will spare no amount of pains or labor to get a thing done, combined with the best interpretation of form, beauty, etc. is what one must have for success.

BAM.  Now go out and do awesome things, y'all.

 

Reference:  Johnson, Mrs. Chas. P, Notable Women of St. Louis, 1914.